agosto 30, 2006

'Mexican democracy' no longer oxymoron

San Antonio Express-News
Editorial
Web Posted: 08/29/2006 06:32 PM CDT

Although Mexico's highest election tribunal has until next week to formally declare a victor in that country's contentious presidential election, the writing is on the wall.
After a partial recount of the 41 million votes cast in the July 2 election, National Action Party candidate Felipe Calderón's lead remains about 240,000 votes — a tantalizingly close, but clear-cut race. The vanquished Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a former Mexico City mayor, has levied charges of outright fraud and inappropriate governmental support for Calderón in the election. He vows to name himself "an alternative president," the Express-News reported.

On Monday, the Federal Electoral Tribunal unanimously found no evidence of widespread fraud in the election, only minor mathematical inaccuracies during the original count. Although the body hasn't formally declared Calderón the winner, many analysts believe that will follow shortly.

López Obrador called the tribunal's ruling "offensive and unacceptable" and characterized the election as a "disgrace" and a "true coup d'etat," according to the Los Angeles Times.

For a nation accustomed to corrupt politicians and the practice of "dedazo," or the handpicking of presidential successors, such rhetoric plays well with the masses.

But it's irresponsible for López Obrador to engage in such fearmongering when he could be using the election as an opportunity to effect change within the system.

The activist ran a strong race and mobilized millions in a clear denouncement of politics as usual. Calderón, whose slim margin is no mandate, must hear that message and act accordingly.

This is the second election since the 71-year political grip of the Institutional Revolutionary Party on the country was shattered. The existence of the independent Federal Electoral Institute and its seven-member tribunal are compelling signs that Mexico's fledgling democracy is taking off.

In two separate polls, about two-thirds of Mexicans surveyed said they oppose the protests and support the tribunal's findings.

It's time for López Obrador to accept his defeat, however distressing, and allow Mexico to move on.

It's (almost) official in Mexico

Chicago Tribune
August 30, 2006

To nobody's surprise, Mexico's electoral tribunal has concluded that conservative Felipe Calderon collected the most votes in the July 2 presidential election. And to nobody's surprise, leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has denounced that conclusion. The tribunal is still one step away from naming Calderon the winner, but that, too, is expected. The judges have until Sept. 6 to rule on Lopez Obrador's contention that the entire election should be annulled because of dirty campaign tactics.

This would be a good time for Lopez Obrador to polish up his concession speech and start building the sort of alliances that will help his Democratic Revolution Party advance its agenda in Mexico's fractious Congress. Instead, he accuses the judges who conducted the partial recount of taking bribes and validating a fraud. He says he will hold a "democratic national assembly" on Sept. 16 --Mexico's Independence Day--to decide whether to set up a parallel government with himself as president.

For nearly a month, thousands of Lopez Obrador's supporters have camped in the capital's Zocalo plaza, demonstrating in the streets, snarling traffic and vowing not to let Calderon govern if he is declared the winner. So far the protest has been largely peaceful, perhaps because the government has done little to disperse the crowd or perhaps because that Sept. 6 deadline seemed to promise a resolution. It's now clear that Lopez Obrador is prepared to carry on indefinitely if he doesn't get his way.

Lopez Obrador insists he is the choice of the Mexican people, but no candidate represents a majority of the population. Though separated by only a 0.6 percent margin, Calderon and Lopez Obrador together got only 70 percent of the vote. And many of Lopez Obrador's supporters seem to be having second thoughts about him. A nationwide poll published in Mexico City's Reforma newspaper on Sunday found that if the election were repeated, Calderon would get 43 percent of the vote and Lopez Obrador 24 percent.

Lopez Obrador needs to stop acting like a victim and start acting like he's interested in a stable future for Mexico. He may not be president, but he can do more for Mexico's disenfranchised poor by working within the system than by encouraging a breakaway government that is doomed to fail.

The Reforma poll found that only 23 percent of Mexican voters think Lopez Obrador's national assembly is a good idea, a strong sign that most of the country is ready to accept the eventual outcome and move on. If they're not careful, Lopez Obrador and what's left of his resistance movement will be left behind.

A popular Mexican problem

The Washington Times
Published August 30, 2006

Mexican presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador should have been preparing his concession speech after the electoral tribunal on Monday unanimously rejected his claims of fraud during the July 2 election. Instead, he told a crowd of supporters, "we will never allow an illegal and illegitimate government to be installed in our country." The new government in Mexico will be neither.

But the new president-elect, who will almost certainly be conservative Felipe Calderon, will have to overcome both stigmas so that his administration will not be hamstrung from the outset. Another challenge for the president-elect will be restoring the credibility of Mexican democracy that Mr. Lopez Obrador has sought to undermine. "I don't want several Mexicos. I don't want an impoverished Mexico. I want one single, strongly developed Mexico with solid economic growth," said Mr. Calderon.

The rift in Mexico is not irreconcilable. Mr. Calderon has handled the divisive situation well, and Mexican voters seem to have recognized it: His support has increased, from the 37 percent of the vote he received on July 2 to 54 percent in a Reforma poll released this week. While most of the increased support for Mr. Calderon's can be attributed to the sharply decreased backing of a third candidate, Roberto Madrazo, some new Calderon supporters formerly favored the Mr. Lopez Obrador, whose popularity has declined from 36 percent on election day to 30 percent in a poll this week. The poll also reported that a solid 62 percent thought Mr. Calderon had won the election, whereas only 25 percent believed Mr. Lopez Obrador to be the rightful winner.

For Mr. Calderon, reaching out to Mr. Lopez Obrador's constituency is almost synonymous with addressing poverty, but the conservative needs to avoid the danger of moving too far from his own agenda in the process. Earlier this month, for instance, Mr. Calderon pledged to correct "the terrible inequality that Mexicans live in," but to do so he proposed large government anti-poverty programs more fitting of his opponent.

The populist's "civil disobedience" is ebbing. After reaching their peak more than a month ago, the protests are losing steam. As Mr. Lopez Obrador's popular backing recedes -- and his rhetoric continues to become more hostile and divisive -- fellow members of his Democratic Revolution Party (PRD) should start to distance themselves. Overall, the PRD did well in the congressional elections, but its association with Mr. Lopez Obrador's irresponsible and unpopular tactics is a bad political move.

Support for Mr. Calderon from moderate leftist leaders in South America would also be a timely boost, and criticism of Mr. Lopez Obrador would have a greater influence coming from a leader like Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva than from either current Mexican President Vicente Fox or U.S. officials. Comparisons to Mr. da Silva, whose disconcerting electoral rhetoric gave way to more fiscally sound presidential policies, painted the Mexican populist in a more moderate light, but Mr. Lopez Obrador's post-electoral actions have thoroughly debunked such analogies.

Mexico edges closer to getting a president

The Miami Herald

OUR OPINION: TIME FOR CHALLENGER TO HALT POLITICAL THEATER

For nearly two months, presidential candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador has stubbornly refused to acknowledge the accumulating evidence of his defeat in Mexico's July 2 election. He has mounted a campaign of civil disobedience, tied up Mexico City in knots with political demonstrations and street closings and openly pressured electoral authorities to cave in to his demands.

This week, however, the Federal Electoral Tribunal declared that after a painstaking review of all the evidence presented by Mr. López Obrador, it would uphold the victory of Felipe Calderón of the National Action Party. Politically and legally, this pulls the rug out from under Mr. López Obrador. The electoral authorities have listened to every reasonable argument and specific challenge his lawyers have submitted and reviewed every bit of evidence. The finding: He doesn't have a case.

Petulant campaign

It's time for him to accept the obvious and abandon his petulant campaign because it offers no hope of advancing his cause. On the contrary, polls in the newspaper Reforma and elsewhere show that Mr. López Obrador's prolonged political tantrum has only lowered his standing in the eyes of the Mexican public. Only 30 percent of those polled say they would vote for him again if they had the chance, and only one in five Mexicans agrees with his campaign of civil resistance.

It has not helped Mr. López Obrador that his political rhetoric has become increasingly aggressive. He has threatened to declare himself president on Sept. 16, Mexican Independence Day, and said he would not allow ``an illegal and illegitimate government to be installed in our country.''

Declare president-elect

That's just sheer demagoguery. The danger is that Mr. López Obrador is painting himself into a corner from which he cannot emerge without having to either eat his words or push the government into a confrontation. Thus far, Mexico's civil society and its public institutions have shown themselves to be remarkably resilient, tolerating his antics and his defiance of authorities because it all makes for a jolly public spectacle. But there's a limit to everything, and it's time to say, Enough, already.

The next step in this drama is for the Electoral Tribunal to declare that Mexico has a president-elect. That will almost surely be Mr. Calderón, since he got the highest number of votes. By law, the panel must act no later than Sept. 6.

Mr. López Obrador would do himself, his followers and the people of Mexico a great favor by acknowledging the results and pledging to support the elected president. That way, he can still emerge from this with a viable political future. The other way, he can only lose yet again.

Coup D'Etat in Mexico?

Los Angeles Times
EDITORIAL

The votes have been counted yet again, but the losing presidential candidate is threatening the peace by failing to recognize the result.

August 30, 2006

A COUP D'ETAT IS BREWING in Mexico. Even as he runs out of legal ways to challenge the July 2 presidential election results, the contest's sore loser, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, is planning to proclaim himself president and establish a parallel "people's government" on the national Day of Independence, Sept. 16.

The defiance by the leftist former mayor of Mexico City comes after a unanimous ruling Monday by the nation's top electoral tribunal, which rejected claims filed by Lopez Obrador's party of massive fraud. Lopez Obrador, who finished second in the balloting, has been waging an increasingly desperate campaign to have the election nullified. The independent panel of seven electoral justices reviewed 9% of polling places where it had reason to suspect error, and it threw out tens of thousands of ballots.

The net result of the review was to reduce conservative candidate Felipe Calderon's nearly quarter-million-vote margin by about 4,000 votes. The tribunal has until next Wednesday to certify the election results.

Lopez Obrador's supporters have shut down much of Mexico City in acts of civil disobedience, and they appear intent on making the country ungovernable. The hope had been to pressure the tribunal into overlooking legal niceties — reformed election laws defer to the election-day count conducted by citizens chosen at random — to annul the vote.

Lopez Obrador and the Democratic Revolution Party, or PRD, are crying out against the imposition of a president backed by the nation's business elite, but the whining is misplaced. Lopez Obrador, who obtained roughly a third of the ballots cast, became an activist in the dark days of the autocratic rule of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, but Mexico's electoral institutions are now fully independent. There has been no convincing proof of any widespread fraud. The election was conducted by nearly a million citizens selected to serve, and foreign observers have all praised the balloting as exemplary.

Indeed, if there is any threat to democracy in Mexico, it is Lopez Obrador and his sense of entitlement. The vast majority of Mexicans, including many of those who voted for him, find his antics tiresome. But even if only 10% or 15% of the population believes its candidate is being unfairly denied the presidency, it can create quite a bit of havoc if egged on by a demagogue exploiting their sense of victimization.

The next weeks and months pose a different challenge for the country's democracy, as Lopez Obrador's supporters will seek to disrupt President Vicente Fox's final State of the Union address on Friday, as well as Independence Day celebrations later in September. Fox's government has shown admirable restraint, but Lopez Obrador is hoping for some violent confrontation with federal authorities to score him sorely needed public opinion points.

Meanwhile, it's time for democratic voices on the left in Mexico to distance themselves from Lopez Obrador's destructive coup attempt. The likes of Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, the PRD's founder who probably was victimized by electoral fraud in his 1988 bid for the presidency, should say basta and encourage everyone to respect the election's outcome.

Piden periódicos de Estados Unidos y Canadá a AMLO aceptar derrota.

Washington, 30 Ago (Notimex).- El candidato de la coalición Por el Bien de Todos, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, debe dejar de actuar como víctima y aceptar su derrota para evitar una desestabilización política en México, pidieron hoy varios periódicos de Norteamérica.

En una inusual coincidencia de opiniones, los diarios estadunidenses The Miami Herald, Los Angeles Times, The Chicago
Tribune, The Washington Times y el canadiense Globe & Mail, indicaron que López Obrador debe preparar su discurso de aceptación de derrota.

En su editorial "¨Un golpe de Estado en México?", Los Angeles Times consideró que es necesario que las voces democráticas de la izquierda mexicana "se distancien de este destructivo intento de golpe de López Obrador".

"Gente como Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas, fundador del PRD (Partido de la Revolución Democrática) que probablemente fue víctima del fraude electoral en su puja por la presidencia en 1988, debería decir "basta" y alentar a todos a que respeten el resultado de la elección" dijo.

The Miami Herald coincidió en que es hora de que López Obrador "acepte lo obvio y abandone su petulante campaña", y criticó su "retórica política crecientemente violenta", en especial su intención de declararse presidente el próximo 16 de septiembre.

"Eso es demagogia llana, el peligro es que el señor López Obrador se esté poniendo en una esquina de la que no pueda salir sin que se trague sus palabras o empuje al gobierno a una confrontación", advirtió el rotativo.

"López Obrador puede hacerse a sí mismo, a sus seguidores y a la gente de México un gran favor reconociendo los resultados y ofreciendo apoyar al presidente electo", indicó The Miami Herald.

"De esa forma puede emerger como un futuro político viable. De otra forma, sólo puede perder", remató.

El diario The Chicago Tribune sugirió en su editorial de este miércoles que el candidato de la coalición Por el Bien de Todos "debe dejar de actuar como víctima y actuar como alguien que está interesado en un futuro estable para México".

"Puede que no sea presidente, pero él puede hacer más por los pobres y marginados de México trabajando con el sistema, más que alentando una ruptura del gobierno que está condenada a fracasar", opinó.

Para el periódico The Washington Times es importante que López Obrador acepte el resultado final del Tribunal Electoral del Poder Judicial de la Federación, máximo órgano electoral en México, que deberá declarar un presidente electo para el próximo 6 de septiembre.

"Los funcionarios electorales han hecho su parte, el señor López Obrador no la ha hecho. Sus protestas no son más que un intento de convertir en rehenes a las instituciones democráticas, a través de protestas en las calles", lamentó.

El diario canadiense Globe & Mail, uno de los más importantes del país, sostuvo que López Obrador necesita hacer lo que todos los candidatos perdedores en una elección democrática hacen: respetar el proceso judicial y aceptar el descalabro.

En su editorial "El adolorido perdedor en México", el rotativo canadiense opinó que López Obrador debe aceptar su descalabro retirarse del campo político, o canalizar su frustración y rabia en avenidas que hagan funcionar mejor el sistema y no lo destruyan.

El enemigo no es AMLO.- Calderón

Calderón se dirigió, con nombre y apellido a su adversario como alguien con quien sólo tiene diferencias

Ariadna García

Ciudad de México (30 agosto 2006).- El candidato presidencial panista, Felipe Calderón, aseguró este miércoles que su enemigo no es el perredista Andrés Manuel López Obrador, sino los problemas de México y las dificultades que enfrenta la sociedad.

Al participar en el Encuentro Nacional de Expertos y Líderes en Salud 2006, Calderón se dirigió, con nombre y apellido, a su adversario de la coalición Por el Bien de Todos como alguien con quien sólo tiene diferencias y no problemas que le lleven a verlo como un enemigo.

"No es un asunto de adversidad entre Felipe Calderón y Andrés Manuel López Obrador, más allá de nuestras diferencias está la adversidad que diariamente están enfrentando millones y millones de mexicanos.

"Para mí el verdadero enemigo en esta materia es la carencia de acceso a los servicios de salud de la gente más marginada en México".

Agregó que si todo el tiempo, la energía y los recursos que se destinan a la división y confrontación entre adversarios se destinara a resolver los problemas de salud en el País, ya se hubiesen salvado muchas vidas y México habría alcanzado ya la cobertura universal en la materia.

"No nos equivoquemos en escoger adversarios. Para mí los enemigos no están en la política, sino en los problemas de México".

El panista reiteró que será un Presidente para todos los mexicanos, centrado en promover la unidad.

Expropia Chávez campos de golf

Reforma
30 de agosto de 2006

CARACAS (AP).- La Alcaldía Metropolitana de Caracas anunció ayer la expropiación de tres campos de golf de la capital venezolana.

La medida tiene por objeto construir viviendas para reubicar a 50 mil familias de clase media, indicaron las autoridades.

Juan Barreto, Alcalde de Caracas, justificó la medida, y aseguró que así se logra la "democratización" de la tierra.

"(La medida) permitirá la democratización de las tierras, la reubicación de familias de clase media, el uso social y el uso público de lo que deben ser espacios públicos", aseguró.

Precisó que la Alcaldía tiene planes de construir viviendas para 50 mil personas en las 147 hectáreas que conforman los campos de los clubes.

El Procurador caraqueño, Juan Manuel Vadell, informó que el 24 de agosto entró en vigor el decreto para expropiar los campos del Caracas Country Club y la Asociación Civil Valle Arriba Golf Club.

Agregó que el proceso en el Lagunita Country Club ya fue firmado, y sólo falta su publicación en la Gaceta Metropolitana.

El presidente del Banco Venezolano de Crédito, Óscar García Mendoza, calificó la medida de visceral, y señaló que responde a una estrategia del gobierno del Presidente Hugo Chávez para distraer la atención sobre la situación de Venezuela en medio de la campaña electoral.

"Esto no es una expropiación que persigue ningún fin de beneficio colectivo, sino, más bien, es una violación a la propiedad privada, lo que parece una continuación del comunismo al que nos quiere llevar esta gente", fustigó García Mendoza.

Debe AMLO reconocer la derrota.- El País

El rotativo español destaca que al Trife le resta pronunciarse sobre la validez de la elección, y en caso afirmativo, proclamará presidente a Felipe Calderón

Grupo Reforma

Ciudad de México (30 agosto 2006).-Tras el fallo del Tribunal Electoral, López Obrador debe reconocer la derrota, frenar las acciones de resistencia y dedicar sus energías a que el PRD influya en el Congreso para promover reformas contra la desigualdad social, señala este miércoles El País en un editorial titulado El paso de Calderón .

El rotativo español destaca que al Trife, "institución de reconocida solvencia e independencia", le resta pronunciarse sobre la validez de la elección presidencial antes del próximo 6 de septiembre, y en caso afirmativo, proclamará presidente a Felipe Calderón pese a las protestas de López Obrador.

"El derechista y candidato del gobernante Partido de Acción Nacional (PAN), Felipe Calderón, está a un paso de ser proclamado presidente de México por el Tribunal Electoral.

"El fallo de la alta instancia sobre 375 impugnaciones, que sigue a uno anterior por el que se desestimó la inviable petición de su principal rival, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, líder del izquierdista Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD) de hacer un nuevo recuento total, ha dejado las cosas como estaban: Calderón, primero, y López Obrador, segundo, con algo más de un tercio de los votos cada uno y separados por tan sólo 0,58 puntos; es decir, lo mismo que tras los resultados provisionales."

Pese a que el diario descarta el argumento del fraude electoral, considera que hubo más fallas en la elección que los estimadas en una primera instancia, debido a la anulación de más de 227 mil votos.

"El hecho de que en la revisión de los recursos el tribunal haya variado la atribución de más de 227 mil votos entre cinco candidatos -es decir, casi la misma diferencia que separa a Calderón de López Obrador- indica que hubo más fallos de los estimados en un principio, y otorga la razón a quienes pedían al menos recuentos parciales.

"Lo ocurrido en México no tiene comparación con lo que en su día pasó en Ucrania o en otros países en los que el poder hizo trampas colosales y se vio forzado a reconocerlo después, gracias, sobre todo, a la movilización popular".

Tras el fallo del Trife, los candidatos del PAN y el PRD deben replantear sus posiciones, afirma el periódico.

"Calderón debe ser consciente de que, aunque ha ganado, lo ha hecho por la mínima, y que si bien su partido es el que más escaños tiene en el Congreso, necesitará ampliar su base para poder gobernar. Y López Obrador, ex alcalde de la capital, tiene que deponer su rebeldía civil.

"López Obrador ha considerado que se le ha usurpado la presidencia, y para denunciarlo utiliza palabras demasiado gruesas como 'golpe de Estado'. No hay nada en la decisión del Tribunal Electoral para mantener esa tesis(...) su idea de una protesta permanente y un Gobierno paralelo sostenido en una discutible indignación popular no es viable.

"Lo que debe hacer es reconocer la derrota y dedicar sus energías a que el PRD influya desde el Congreso sobre unas políticas que deben hacer de la lucha contra la desigualdad social una prioridad".

El diario español sentenció que el proceso electoral debe darse por concluido, ya que México necesita de "unidad y sentido común".

Obrador, una amenaza para México.- El Mundo

El diario español El Mundo también abordó el tema electoral mexicano en un editorial publicado este miércoles.

En el editorial titulado "Obrador, una amenaza para México", advierte que en caso de que el perredista no cambie de rumbo puede llevar al País a una severa crisis.

"Si el candidato del PRD no entra en razón puede sumir a México en una crisis de tal magnitud que echaría por tierra el camino recorrido en los últimos 10 años", advierte.

Opina Europa sobre escenario mexicano

Otros rotativos europeos dieron su visión sobre el escenario político mexicano, según el francés Liberation, en la próximas dos semanas existe riesgo de que se produzcan choques por la coyuntura de las fiestas patrias.

Por otro lado, Le Figaro consideró que las protestas de Por el Bien de Todos obligarán a tomar mayores medidas de seguridad en la Ciudad.

El rotativo alemán Berliner Zeitung criticó que López Obrador no acepte la decisión del TEPJF y considera de que está perdiendo la oportunidad de perder con decencia.

Puede AMLO dañar al PRD.- FT

El rotativo londinense afirmó que López Obrador debe canalizar sus protestas por la vía constitucional

Grupo Reforma

Ciudad de México (30 agosto 2006).-En un editorial publicado el miércoles, titulado Tiempo de guardar la tienda , el rotativo Financial Times afirma que las acciones de resistencia civil, encabezadas por Andrés Manuel López Obrador podrían crear una inestabilidad que a la postre dañaría el progreso económico y social que México ha conseguido en los últimos años.

"Esto es peligroso por varias razones. Primero, López Obrador podría dañar la credibilidad y reducir el apoyo que recibe del PRD. Diversos sondeos han demostrado que los mexicanos han rechazado contundentemente las acciones de resistencia del líder de izquierda. Muchos, incluyendo a gran número de personas que votaron por López Obrador en Julio, ansían continuar sus vidas con normalidad."

"Segundo, independientemente de sus intenciones, López Obrador compromete la capacidad de las autoridades electas a nivel nacional y local, para gobernar efectivamente. Esto incluye al gobierno del Distrito Federal, que ganó el PRD en julio.

"Tercero, López Obrador corre riesgo de que grupos radicales protagonicen acciones violentas en su nombre. El caos y la inestabilidad que podrían generarse como resultado de esto, podría causar gran daño a México, minando el progreso económico y social que el País ha conseguido en los últimos años."

El diario londinense considera que en los próximos días el Trife podría confirmar el triunfo de Felipe Calderón y que AMLO deberá aceptar el resultado pese a que no se realizó el recuento total de votos.

"La disputada contienda electoral mexicana está a punto de llegar a su fin. Después de que las autoridades electorales descartaron los alegatos legales que cuestionaban la elección, en los próximos días podrían confirmar el apretado triunfo de Felipe Calderón, el candidato de derecha. Esto dejará muchas preguntas abiertas sobre la elección, pero López Obrador, candidato de izquierda, deberá aceptar el resultado.

"Acertada o equivocadamente, millones de mexicanos, en su mayoría pobres, creen que el proceso electoral no fue limpio. Un recuento total de votos hubiera sido la mejor manera de demostrar que la democracia mexicana es genuina y representativa. Dado el historial nacional de profundas divisiones sociales y geográficas, el recuento también hubiera servido para legitimar al próximo presidente."

El periódico inglés señala que López Obrador debe protestar por la vía legal y abandonar las acciones de resistencia civil.

"López Obrador parece estar determinado más que nunca a embarcarse en una serie de acciones radicales, designadas para conseguir, la 'revolución pacífica y democrática' que considera que México necesita. La ocupación de la capital por parte de sus seguidores continua. El siguiente mes, López Obrador podría asumir la presidencia de un 'Gobierno paralelo'.

"Por lo tanto, López Obrador debe canalizar sus protestas por la vía constitucional. Él está en una excelente posición para hacerlo. Su partido (PRD) tiene 126 diputados en la Cámara Baja del Congreso, el mejor resultado que ha conseguido en su historia. El partido está en una buena posición para presionar, desde la oposición, por una reforma política. Persistir con su acciones de resistencia podría ser un desastre para López Obrador, su partido, y sobre todo para su País."

Time to fold the tent

Financial times
Published: August 30 2006 03:00

The saga of Mexico's disputed election is entering its final stages. After a partial recount electoral authorities on Monday dismissed legal challenges to last month's vote and within the next few days they look set to confirm the narrow triumph of Felipe Calderón, the centre-right candidate. This will leave many questions about the election unanswered but it is a result that the defeated leftwing candidate, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, should accept.

Rightly or wrongly, millions of mainly poorer Mexicans believe that the election was unfair. A full recount would have been the best way to demonstrate that Mexico´s democracy is genuine and representative. Given the country's history and deep social and geographical divisions, a recount would also have helped establish the legitimacy of any incoming president.

Yet the electoral authorities have ruled out this option and Mr López Obrador must decide what to do. He appears more determined than ever to embark on a radical course of action, designed to secure, as he told the Financial Times last week, the "peaceful and democratic . . . revolution" that he believes Mexico needs. The occupation of central Mexico City by his supporters will continue. Next month, Mr López Obrador could assume the presidency of a "parallel government".

This is dangerous for several reasons. First, Mr López Obrador could damage the credibility and reduce the support of his Democratic Revolution Party (PRD). Opinion polls have shown that Mexicans are heavily opposed to the direct action being recommended by the leftwing leader. Many, including a large number of those who voted for Mr López Obrador in July, are anxious to resume their daily lives.

Second, whatever his stated intentions, Mr López Obrador risks weakening the ability of elected authorities at both national and local level to govern effectively. These include the local government of Mexico City, won in July by the PRD.

Third, Mr López Obrador runs the risk of encouraging extremists to take violent action on his behalf. The chaos and instability resulting from all this could do a great deal of damage to Mexico, undermining the economic and social progress that the country has made in recent years.

Mr López Obrador should therefore seek to exercise his right to protest through constitutional channels. He is in an excellent position to do so. His PRD party emerged from the vote with 126 deputies in the lower house of congress, their best ever showing. The party would be well placed to press the opposition's campaign for political reform, including for example a second round of voting in future presidential elections, a simple change that would make disputes less likely to occur in future. Persisting with his current course would be a disaster for Mr López Obrador, his party and, above all, for his country.

El paso de Calderón

EDITORIAL
EL PAÍS - Opinión - 30-08-2006

El derechista y candidato del gobernante Partido de Acción Nacional (PAN), Felipe Calderón, está a un paso de ser proclamado presidente de México por el Tribunal Electoral, una institución de reconocida solvencia e independencia. El fallo de la alta instancia sobre 375 impugnaciones, que sigue a uno anterior por el que se desestimó la inviable petición de su principal rival, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, líder del izquierdista Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD) de hacer un nuevo recuento total, ha dejado las cosas como estaban: Calderón, primero, y López Obrador, segundo, con algo más de un tercio de los votos cada uno y separados por tan sólo 0,58 puntos; es decir, lo mismo que tras los resultados provisionales. Sin embargo, el hecho de que en la revisión de los recursos el tribunal haya variado la atribución de más de 227.000 votos entre cinco candidatos -es decir, casi la misma diferencia que separa a Calderón de López Obrador- indica que hubo más fallos de los estimados en un principio, y otorga la razón a quienes pedían al menos recuentos parciales.

Al Tribunal Electoral le queda aún pronunciarse sobre la validez general de los comicios antes del próximo 6 de septiembre; y, en caso afirmativo, como es previsible, pese a las protestas del candidato del PRD, proclamar vencedor al líder del PAN. Esto obliga a ambos a replantearse sus posiciones. Calderón debe ser consciente de que, aunque ha ganado, lo ha hecho por la mínima, y que si bien su partido es el que más escaños tiene en el Congreso, necesitará ampliar su base para poder gobernar. Y López Obrador, ex alcalde de la capital, tiene que deponer su rebeldía civil. Lo ocurrido en México no tiene comparación con lo que en su día pasó en Ucrania o en otros países en los que el poder hizo trampas colosales y se vio forzado a reconocerlo después, gracias, sobre todo, a la movilización popular. El país americano no se puede permitir estafas electorales ni una calle soliviantada. Necesita unidad y sentido común. Es tiempo de dar por cerrados estos comicios.

López Obrador ha considerado que se le ha usurpado la presidencia, y para denunciarlo utiliza palabras demasiado gruesas como "golpe de Estado". No hay nada en la decisión del Tribunal Electoral para mantener esa tesis, ni el recurso se ha ganado porque uno u otro tuviera mejores abogados o estrategia, como le ocurrió a Bush frente a Kerry en 2004. Su idea de una protesta permanente y un Gobierno paralelo sostenido en una discutible indignación popular no es viable. Lo que debe hacer es reconocer la derrota y dedicar sus energías a que el PRD influya desde el Congreso sobre unas políticas que deben hacer de la lucha contra la desigualdad social una prioridad.

Considera Financial Times que López Obrador debe aceptar su derrota

30 de agosto de 2006
Milenio

El diario, añadió que, un recuento total de los votos habría sido la mejor vía para demostrar que la democracia de México es "genuina y representativa". Mientras que, los diarios El País y El Mundo coincidieron en pedir al abanderado de izquierda respetar el fallo del Tribunal.

Londres.- Tras ser desestimadas las demandas legales contra los resultados de las presidenciales mexicanas, el candidato izquierdista Andrés Manuel López Obrador debe aceptar la derrota, afirmó hoy el diario Financial Times.

"Muchos, incluido un gran número de quienes votaron por López Obrador en julio, están ansiosos por retornar a sus vidas diarias", por lo que López Obrador debe aceptar que perdió y concluir con las movilizaciones, indicó el diario británico en su editorial.

Según señaló FT el tribunal electoral confirmará en los próximos días el triunfo del candidato del Partido Acción Nacional (PAN), Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, por lo que "la disputa electoral está entrando en su estadio final".

De acuerdo con FT, el fallo de las autoridades electorales "dejará muchas preguntas sobre las elecciones sin contestar, pero es un resultado que el derrotado candidato de la izquierda, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, debería aceptar".

Añadió que, un recuento total de los votos habría sido la mejor vía para demostrar que la democracia de México es "genuina y representativa" y habría ayudado a establecer la legitimidad de cualquier presidente entrante.

Y es que, según subrayó el periódico, millones de mexicanos mayoritariamente pobres creen que las elecciones fueron injustas.

Según FT, el impulso de lo que López Obrador llamó "revolución pacífica y democrática" y la formación de un gobierno paralelo es peligrosa por muchas razones.

Para el periódico, esta posibilidad dañaría la credibilidad y reduciría el apoyo al PRD, ya que los sondeos de opinión muestran que los mexicanos son fuertemente contrarios a una acción directa por parte del líder izquierdista.

Por otra parte, López Obrador se arriesga a debilitar la habilidad para gobernar de las autoridades elegidas, tanto en el ámbito local como en el nacional, y "esto incluye al gobierno local de la Ciudad de México, ganado en julio por el PRD".

En tercer lugar, dijo, AMLO "corre el riesgo de animar a que extremistas emprendan acciones violentas en su nombre. El caos y la inestabilidad resultante podría causar un gran daño a México, a su economía subyacente y al progreso social que el país ha logrado".

López Obrador, por lo tanto, "debería buscar ejercer su derecho de protesta mediante los canales constitucionales", según el diario, "está en una excelente posición para hacerlo", argumentó.

"El PRD salió de las elecciones con 126 diputados en la cámara baja del congreso, su mejor (resultado)", destacó, de manera que "el partido estaría en un buen lugar para impulsar una campaña de oposición a favor de la reforma política".

Entre los posibles cambios, Financial Times citó la introducción de una segunda vuelta para las próximas elecciones presidenciales, "un cambio simple que podría hacer menos probable que ocurran estas disputas en el futuro".

En cualquier caso, "persistir con el actual curso (de protestas) sería un desastre para López Obrador, su partido y, por encima de todo, su país", concluyo FT.

Andrés: ni me doblo ni me quiebro

Joaquín López Dóriga
En privado
Milenio
30 de agosto de 2006
lopezdoriga@milenio.com

Para qué reñir si podemos reír. Florestán

El domingo 6 de agosto, Andrés Manuel López Obrador terminó su alocución del Zócalo citando a Melchor Ocampo: “¡Me quiebro, pero no me doblo!”, exclamó.

Unos días después comenté coloquialmente que la cita de don Melchor era al revés, a partir del dicho popular “soy como la rama del guayabo: me doblo pero no me quiebro”, tal y como ya lo había parafraseado el mismo Andrés Manuel el 11 de abril del año pasado, (Jornada 12-IV-05) a los tres días de que le despojaran del fuero.

No le di importancia porque no era importante, pero López Obrador sí, y el viernes pasado terminó su encendida intervención en el Zócalo así:

“¡Como decía Melchor Ocampo, me quiebro pero no me doblo! Y aprovecho para contestarles a los que andan viendo qué digo, porque después que dije esa frase de Ocampo, “me quiebro pero no me doblo”, un conductor de estos sabiondos (sic) dijo que no es así, que es al revés: me doblo pero no me quiebro. ¡Que lo busque en la historia! Y eso, dijo con sorna, que es de los conductores máaaaas afamados, de los periodistas máaaaas destacados de este país. ¡Aprovecho de una vez para aclararlo!”

Para mí no hubiera pasado de otra lanzada, hasta que uno de los suyos me identificó como el destinatario del reclamo, lo que ampliaron sus corifeos, diciendo, claro, que López Obrador tenía razón.

Ante el señalamiento, le hice caso y busqué en la historia, en Noticias del Imperio de Fernando del Paso cuando Benito Juárez (p.320), desesperado por la situación, cavila:

“Sí, sí, pero el caso es que estoy cada vez más solo. O quizás debiera decir: estamos cada vez más solos. Era Melchor ¿no es cierto? Melchor Ocampo el que decía yo me doblo pero no me quiebro. Pues a veces pienso que yo sí, un día me voy a quebrar”.

Yo sé que López Obrador, a diferencia de Juárez, nunca se ha planteado esa disyuntiva, quebrarse o doblarse, porque eso no está en él.

Pero sí, con todo respeto, el darle importancia a lo que no la tiene, confundir una cita, y mandar una airada advertencia desde esa plaza de juicios populares donde su palabra es la ley.

Lo demás, no tiene la menor importancia.

Retales

1. LA MESA. Como le adelanté ayer, el PAN se quedó con la Presidencia de la Mesa Directiva de la Cámara de Diputados con los votos del PRI, Verde, Alianza y Alternativa, contra los de la coalición. Así, Jorge Zermeño presidirá la sesión del Informe, que responderá, si Fox lo puede leer;

2. GAMBOA. La Junta de Coordinación Política se la quedó en forma transitoria el PAN, hasta que reformen la ley orgánica, después del lunes 11, y pase a manos del PRI para que la presida Emilio Gamboa; y

3. VERDES. Jorge Emilio González quiso encarecer su voto, necesario para construir la mayoría calificada de ayer, y exigió hablar con Felipe Calderón para vendérselo. Pero no lo logró.

Nos vemos mañana, pero en privado.